A Hat By Any Other Name

Men's Dress Hats - Scala Wool Felt Top Hat - The Mad Hatter Top HatLily Tomlin hit a nerve when she asked the unanswerable: Why isn’t there a special name for the tops of your feet? I mean, there’s a specific name for just about everything else you can think of: your forearm has its ulna, and the end of a hammer head opposite the striking face is apparently called a peen, for pete’s sake. Everybody knows a ferrule is the metal band on a pencil that holds the eraser in place, but I wasn’t aware that the revolving star on the back of a cowboy’s spurs is a rowel.

Hats have very specific names too: you’ve got your stovepipe or top hat (also called a plug hat); you’ve got your baseball cap, beret and bicorne. There’s your boater, bonnet and bowler (or derby) and caps, cloches and chef’s hats. Cowboy hats, westerns, ten gallons and outbacks. Am I getting my point across? Ivys, newsboys, driver’s caps and Greek Fishermen’s hats. Fedoras, homburgs and trilbies.

So, if the English language can come up with a word for the flat, square head-covers that students wear (and toss) at graduations, then why isn’t there a special name for the tops of your feet?

Thanks for reading,
Steve Singer
CEO Hartford York

If you knew that the grad hats are called mortarboards, you might enjoy free updates of this blog by email or RSS.

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Published in: on January 18, 2008 at 1:28 am  Leave a Comment  

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